Murder By Experts: Origins of a Classic Old Time Radio Show

Murder By Experts was a commercial. By itself, that is not a bad thing. After all, radio itself was built as a means of marketing. The empires of the huge networks were based on selling things. So the last thing on my mind is to berate Experts for being a commercial. In fact, the purpose of this post is to praise it for being such a subtle, yet effective one.

screamPart of the subtlety came from the fact that Murder By Experts was broadcast over the Mutual Network. NBC and CBS programs were more disciplined, in that they usually had sponsors of their own, or they were sustained by the network until they could find a sponsor. Many Mutual programs were syndicated, meaning that the local broadcaster would insert the local commercials. Because they were syndicated, Mutual programs had to be good enough to sell themselves to the local stations. A show on another network may have been written to appeal to the audience in the big eastern cities, but it was still heard by affiliates in the rural Midwest.

There was little worry about the appeal of Murder By Experts. It was put together by one of the most successful writing teams in radio, David Kogan and Robert A. Arthur. Kogan had grown up on radio drama and pulp fiction stories, and wanted to create stories of his own. While attending class in writing for radio at Columbia University, he met Arthur. Arthur was a world traveler, having grown up in an Army family, had a master’s degree in journalism, and a compulsive need to tell stories. The pair began collaborating on programs for Mutual affiliate WOR.

Ellery_Queen_NYWTSTheir first effort was Dark Destiny, which set their working relationship. Generally, they would begin with a brainstorming session where plotting and characters would be developed. One partner or the other then sat before the typewriter and put the script together, and Kogan would usually finish by directing the show. After Dark Destiny, the duo went on to create their signature program, The Mysterious Traveler, and they also worked on The Sealed Book, Master Detective, Nick Carter and others.

Murder By Experts was a departure for the writing team, but that was the ingenious subtlety of the program. Rather than inventing new plots, they would adapt the recommendation of an “expert”, another writer of thriller fiction. The subtlety was that each program would gain attention for three different mystery writers. The first would be the show’s host, John Dickson Carr. By the time of the broadcasts, Carr was already a well recognized name in the Mystery fiction game, but his latest project got a nice plug in each episode (the same would be true of his replacement, Brett Halliday after Carr left the series in mid-1950).

CN 012464Along with the host, the guest “expert” would get a plug for his latest story as well as giving a plug to the author whose tale was presented in that episode. With their own success seemingly in hand, Kogan and Arthur were willing to do what they could to help other writers to make a living. In fact, it may have led to their demise. Murder By Experts is included in the list of victims of McCarthyism; Kogan and Arthur were involved in the Radio Writers Guild, a labor union which fell under the spotlight of the House Un-American Activities Committee. By then, Experts was already the victim of Mutual’s lack of sponsor support.

This entry was posted in I Was A Communist For the FBI, McCarthyism, Murder By Experts, Old Time Radio and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to Murder By Experts: Origins of a Classic Old Time Radio Show

  1. Dario says:

    It’s a coincidence. I was listening to Nick Carter last night. When I was a kid our family spent a lot of Sundays listening to Mutual’s lineup-The Shadow, True detective Mysteries, the Mysterious Traveler, Nick Carter and so forth. I still is those days and it all happened more than 60 years ago.

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