Christmas in Wistful Vista: Part 4

Skipping down Christmas Nostaliga Lane we return to our favorite old time radio comedy, Fibber McGee and Molly:

On Christmas Eve 1946 becomes special; it is one of the few times the show is broadcast on Christmas Eve.  Teeny, the young girl that Marian plays in addition to Molly has convinced Fibberto fix some broken toys for less fortunate children. Of course toys that are broken become toys that are destroyed when Fibber tries to fix them! To be sure the kids have a good Christmas Fibber spends all of the McGee’s Christmas money on new toys. Teeny, with the help of the King’s Men finishes the show with a lovely rendition of Clement C. Moore’s The Night Before Christmas.  Enjoy the following Christmas Radio Show:

http://www.fibbermcgeeandmolly.com/mp3/fm461224 Fixing Broken Toys For Needy Children.mp3

This episode is from Old Time Radio’s Fibber McGee’s Christmas Collection.

Great Gildersleeve Christmas: Part 2

The Great Gildersleeve was one of the first households in broadcasting to feature a nontraditional family- two children being raised by an uncle with no father of mother. This doesn’t make Christmas any less special.

Christmas Day, 1946 would fall on a Wednesday, the night The Great Gildersleeve was broadcast. And it is going to be a wonderful traditional family Christmas, Except that Gildy has convinced himself that the Bullard’s across the street are having marital problems. Worse, Leroy’s friend Craig Bullard will be forced to spend the holiday alone. Of course Gildersleeve would never spread rumors unless he was absolutely sure, would he?

http://www.greatgildersleeve.com/mp3/GG461225%20Christmas%20Caroling%20at%20Home.mp3

The 1948 season is special with the addition of the “Mystery Baby” plot arc. Christmas that year is going to be extra special with a baby in the house. The Christmas season begins with a mystery as Christmas presents and other treasures begin to disappear from the house. There is fright and confusion, even the Summerfield police department becomes involved. Everyone including Leroy (Walter Tetley) and Bea Benaderet has forgotten that there is a curious baby in the house…

http://www.greatgildersleeve.com/mp3/GG481222%20Family%20Christmas.mp3

Two week later the family is happily making preparations for the baby’s first Christmas Eve. That is when Judge Hooker presents the baby’s missing father. There won’t be a dry eye around the radio as we hear Gildersleeve say good bye to the Baby that has brought so much joy to his world.

The genuine love and happiness we hear in the Gildersleeve Christmas Radio Shows household makes the holidays even more special for the rest of us.

Patriotic Radio, How Fibber Won the War

The wave of American Patriotism during the Second World War is a phenomenon that may seem foreign to modern audiences. But this genuine feeling of involvement in the War was nearly universal.

A good example of this is the popular program, Fibber McGee And Molly. Fibber and Molly were characters created by Jim and Marian Jordan, a couple who were in Vaudeville before coming to the radio. The success of their show was due not only to their terrific comedic showmanship, but the work of their very talented writer, Don Quinn. The program revolved around Fibber, a ?professional busy-body?, his loving and long suffering wife, and Fibber’s interactions with their neighbors. Quinn was a genius at working the sponsor’s message into comedy of the program, and thus guaranteed the program a long and successful run (1935-1959).

The first broadcast after the attack on Pearl Harbor (Dec 9, 1941) opens with a letter from the sponsor (S.C. Johnson Wax) expressing solidarity with the Nation in a time of crisis, and a promise that the show would continue in the name of National Morale.

Writer Quinn was incredibly successful at incorporating messages from the Office of War Information into the program. Even before Pearl Harbor the characters took time to collect games and books for the entertainment of soldiers at the local Army camp. Scrap drives were featured, along with subtle messages about the importance of rationing. The show had enough success spreading this home-front propaganda that they were given an ?exclusive? opportunity to plug recruitment for the Merchant Marine. The day following the broadcast was the busiest recruiting day experienced by the Merchant Marine Service.

The War touched the company on a personal level, just as it had for so many in the country. Gale Gordon, who played Mayor LaTrivia, was drafted near the end of 1943. although the character was usually left befuddled after his exchanges with Fibber, on his last show before leaving for the Coast Guard (when Gordon was drafted, naturally LaTrivia was as well) he managed to get in the last word:
“Well for heaven’s sake, McGee, stop your griping. You’re lucky you’ve got a car at all. Well, excuse me, McGee, but when I get over to Africa or Australia or wherever they send me, I’ll be thinking of you, McGee, and all you’re suffering… Goodbye, Mrs. McGee. I’ll see you when this is over…. And McGee, when you drive, if you get up to thirty-five miles an hour, think of somebody who didn’t get a lifeboat. Goodbye. [Exit LaTrivia under loud applause.]

http://www.otrcat.net/otr6/Fibber-450522-0441-Fibber-Is-In-Charge-Of-War-Bond-Concert.mp3

We are very proud to include Fibber McGee and Molly in our collection of examples of Patriotic Radio Programs.